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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 256 (some duplicates have been removed)
kicks off his second term with a call for national unity. >> a regional election in germany, a wakeup call for the chancellor. >> and extreme winter weather halts travel across much of northern europe. >> we start this show in washington where president obama balm has publicly taken the oath of office for his second term. he had to take it twice. >> official ceremony held in private on sunday at the white house. now the ceremonial swearing in in front of more than 700,000 people that showed up. >> and an international audience watching on tv. a lot of europeans want to know which way the world's biggest economy is headed and can politicians sort things out. here is a man that thinks he can make a difference the second time around. obama then looked forward to his next and final four years in office calling an end to the politics of division and saying the united states could achieve anything if it acted as one. >> a decade of war is now ending. an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all of the qualities this world without boundaries deman
is here at it is about our president. take back the house, elected democrats at every level of government and fight for our values for 100% of the american people. thank you. thank you, madam chair. [applause] >> thank you, secretary. the next item on the committee's agenda is the report from the credentials committee. i'd like to recognize co-chairs to give us an update on this. >> in a. >> thank you, madam chair. on the have of the rest of the potential committee we are honored to present our report. >> the credentials committee received a challenge to the election of dnc members from the state of georgia, and a challenge to the election process used in the election of dnc members from virginia. >> most of these challenges were received in a timely fashion, and reviewed by the credentials committee co-chair. after reviewing each of these challenges, the co-chairs determined that neither of the challenges have merit and the members under challenge were to comment to be properly elected members of the democratic national committee. >> with that, we now recommend to this body the adoption
, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
only introduced before the election. keeping our promise. taking all of those steps and making sure that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest. that is a record we should be proud of. >> my constituency is enduring something hideous. thanks to the european union. with my right honorable friend remind us that the british economy -- businesses far less able to cope with -- >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. as mrs. are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just from europe, but more generally. that is why we should be fighting in europe for more flexible europe and a europe where received regulations come off. the view of the party opposite is to sit back, do nothing, and never listen to the british people or business minds. >> order. >> you have been watching prime minister's questions from the british house of commons. western time airs live on c- span2 every wednesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern, when the house of commons is in session. and again on sunday nights. watch anytime at c-span.org. you can find video of past prime ministers questions and othe
. but the omens are not good. her coalition has just lost a regional election that was widely viewed as a test of public opinion. >> at first, it looked like the german chancellor's party would win. when the final ballots were counted, it became clear the democrats were on their way out. the results show the coalition of angela merkle's party or one seat behind the opposition. the loss by the christian democrats came about because their supporters tried to vote strategically. usually, christian democrat voters cast a ballot for free democrats. at first, they were thrilled at their score. >> i think it is no surprise some conservatives actually gave us a vote to make sure we would be able to continue with the coalition. >> as the votes were counted, it became clear the political blood transfusion had not work. .- worked how could she continued to help the free democrats across germany without hurting her own party poppies -- party potsies popularity. even her star power was not enough to turn things around. keeping the coalition partner ally came at a heavy price, one she may not want to pay ag
>> one of the first to cast the vote in israel's election. you're watching "al jazeera." we meet a boy who feels betrayed by the world. the u.n. intervenes in the south china seas. police officers in mexico say they have had enough. israelis are voting in their general election. binyamin netanyahu is a clear favorite to win another term in office. we're covering the election for us of there. is it shaping up? .> we're in west jerusalem there have been a steady trickle of voters coming and. sraelis are is re eligible to vote. it looks like to be a good turnout. the question is to what extend binyamin netanyahu can claim a mandate for victory. prime minister binyamin netanyahu casting his ballot. >> want them to succeed. >> he has a commanding lead in all polls. there are new kids on israel's political bloc. >> he is trying to make this campaign a personal campaign on his ability to be the prime minister. yes or no? specific questions about policies. >> the votes have been dominating the headlines. the likud party ran on a single ballad. have lost support to this man. they appealed
's the latest mickey mouse gimmick to win elections without having to win the most number of votes. remember the tricks they tried in 2012? all those changes in the voting times, all those cuts in the number of voting booths, all that effort to make it harder for people to vote? all that targeting of the people who tend to vote in ways the remembers don't like people voting? remember all that? well, now they're trying something new. they don't like that states like pennsylvania regularly vote democratic. so some political quacks came up with the idea of breaking up the state's electoral votes so the rural areas will get more power. they don't like the urban vote, as they call it, going to democratic. so they decided to kill its power over how the state goes overall. look, the real fight here is by the republicans against the country's shifting demographics. if they don't get or can't get people to vote for them they try to kill the power of those who don't. will they get away with it? not if you stay tuned and keep an eye on these little buggers. they've got their mickey mouse ears on, they'
elections, is thinking fast or has been over the past two weeks of the popularity threshold and angela merkel has been riding and both of their parties are dithering. the sbc slightly inching higher and the sdu inching lower and they're both losing ground in a grander scale. it's the small parties that are the winners, definitely the green wes a record high of over 13%. they're the ones that won the election and lost it for the cdu, not stoeshl democrats themselves. and the liberals, the sdp, many had counted them out and there was an expectation or there was a fear for some that they couldn't even make the century hurdle that you need to get into parliament. they beat that. about you also for the personality ratings and the criticism on a federal scale, but that was his home turf so there was a lot of sympathy vote going in there. the big parties will have to look carefully for coalition partners. the social democrats will try to align themselves with the green that might not be enough. the stronger the greens get, the more the social democrats usually lose and something similar you h
the next election. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> i think the surprise was some of the turnout. some of the turnout, especially in urban areas. >> forget policy. if you can't win it, just go ahead and rig it. the gop moves to steal elections. first stop? virginia. david corn and charnelle herring tell us if the dirty move could work. the right still can't handle hillary. >> she obviously has an enduring media. >> so the king of the sunday shows bites the hand that feeds him. >> the president's vision for his second term to annihilate the republican party. >> richard wolffee on the republican party's new nerve. >>> democrats just missed a huge opportunity to change the o'country. larry cohen on harry reiding filibuster cave. >>> women get overdue recognition to serve in combat. the right wing is freaking out. former marine goldie taylor is here to put them in their place. >>> thanks for watching. it's time to wake up, america. got to pay attention to this one. the republican attempt to steal the next presidential election, it has hit full throttle. this is the lat
hostage? >> we would say broken because lots of energy goes into electing these senators individually and then the results are almost nothing. so that's why we would say broken. you could definitely say it's held hostage. but we would say broken because i think regardless of how the deck is, stacks up, republicans, independents and democrats it should not function this way. i mean, we really do believe that. you know, we think our members and working people in this country and most americans would say it's fair. people get elected. at some point, the majority should rule. and that's the way it is in every other democracy in the world. >> but as we talk what's up with harry reid? he does seem to be backing away from the strong reform that you propose. i brought a story from talkingpointsmemo.com. senate majority leader harry reid is voicing support for a set of changes to the current filibuster rules that would fall far short of the more sweeping proposals from people like mr. cohen. what's he -- what's up? >> well, i think part of what's up is he's got four or five mocrats, many of th
as it was four years ago. make sure you know that what we are celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president, what we are doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy, not only of our past, but also of our future. god bless you. i love you. we will see you tomorrow. [applause] ♪ ["we take care of our own"] ♪ ♪ ["only in america"] ♪ >> as part of our inauguration fightge, the u.s. army's and drum corps -- they will escort president obama down pennsylvania avenue during the inaugural parade. ♪ [drum line] >> it began in april with the production team. it prepares the materials, the music, the drill that we do. parade marching does not require quadrilles, but we do a great deal of research with 18th-century music portrayed on modern instruments that aren't -- that are reminiscent of instruments during the revolutionary war. the rangers a range of vignettes -- are arranged vignettes music from the 18th century that has m
elections. he was asked if the president has met his expectations during the first term. >> he has seen the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congre
not expect to witness an election won by overinflate. some will look longingly on the time when one candidate dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson grittily be very goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenge
. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your reform asking for, demanding next tuesday? >> four things. one, that the majority leader of the senate can put a bill on the floor for discussion and debate. right now he can't do that unless he has 60 votes to do that. he can't even proceed. >> number two. >> number two, nominations. the president makes nominations. there needs to be a clear way for those nominations to get discussed in a short period of time. not 30 hours of senate time, which is more than a week. but in a short period of time, they get discussed and they get a vote on nominations. number three, a conference committee. the house passes one bill. the s
we're celebrating is not the election or swearing-in of a president. what we're doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy not only of our past but also of our future. god bless you guys. i love you. we'll see you tomorrow. [ applause ] ♪ >> the president of the united states, with the first lady and the vice president and the second lady over at the national building museum here in washington. the festivities only just beginning. getting ready for the big inauguration tomorrow. piers morgan is getting ready to take over our coverage. great to have you here on the national mall. >> very exciting. i have never done an inauguration before. incredibly exciting. i was struck there by the body of the language. seems very relaxed man and comes from being re-elected and facing another great, historic day, a man much more at ease than perhaps the nerve last time. >> four years as president and now another four years and he was elected pretty
from that guy. i think they won in a low turn in elections in wisconsin. i think everybody should run now. go into elections where there's a lot of voters so you don't get this weird warped sense of people who supposedly represent the american electorate. that guy doesn't represent anybody. your thoughts. the current secretary of state's performance today against the performance on the side of the right. >> he was so overmatched, ron johnson. he opened questions by saying it could have been taken a very simple phone call to ascertain the truth. my god, did he look at the pictures of that carnage? nothing was very simple. he proved he's very simple. his questions were disrespectful and i was thrilled that she got angry at him. women are sometimes told never to get emotional or angry. she did both. she choked up a bit in her introduction and got angry at ron johnson as she should. she lectured rand paul. on had i been president, you would have been fired. >> to consider the prospect of rand paul. but he's got none. >> he has a healthy imagination. >> you mentioned compassion and feeling
justice, distinguished justices of the court, my fellow statewide elected officials, members of armed forces and national guard, members of the consular corps, governor christine gregoire, and my fellow washingtonians. this we know,our world is changing faster and more dramatically than ever before. once in a lifetime events now seem to happen with startling regularity. we've seen the greatest financial crisis since the great depression, natural disasters fueled by climate change, and unimaginable human tragedies like sandy hook elementary. technology, medicine, and the fundamental understanding of our universe. every day i am left in awe at how much we are able to achieve, and heartbroken over the uncertainty, we see opportunity. and we all feel a profound responsibility to our children and our grandchildren. we have a spirit of innovation here in washington that haswe are not done. [applause] a new world economy is emerging from the depths of this recession, and while its contours and relationships are not fully understood to us, we do know two things, one. with our uniquely powerfu
, not as significant, but i have to ask you, isn't an african-american winning re-election as president actually just as significant as winning election in the first place? >> no doubt about it, martin. a lot of people were saying that the first time was some type of fluke, that barack obama just outsmarted folks for one time, but you got to remember what he dealt with. every single thing he did, martin, was opposed by the republicans, everything, everything. he had one of the worst economies in many, many years. he had all kinds of catastrophes and people forget about the bp spill, forget about the economy, they forget about all the jobs we were losing, forget about the unemployment rate at the time he was running for office. but yet and still -- and don't forget voter suppression, voter suppression, all kinds of efforts to strike out early voting, and yet and still he still had a tremendous victory. and i think that was reaffirming. it really was because i think it made a lot of people feel that, first of all, americans got it, they understood what he had gone through, they wanted to reward him for
'll give you a little straight talk. look at the last election. look at the last election. we are losing dramatically the hispanic vote, which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons. and we've got to understand that. second of all, we can't go on forever with 11 million people living in this country in the shadows. >> i want to bring in "new york times" columnist nick chrisoff and jackie kucinich. is this time different? you were looking at the full screen earlier there. you have a bipartisan group. big hitters in there. schumer, mccain, rubio.menendez. it feels to me as if a month of sundays may have just hit the calendar. the stars are aligning. it does feel different. whether it's going to be enough i don't know. i think republicans have really been sobered by the last election results. i think they feel they have to do something. seeing leadership from people like marco rubio i think really does give a lot of republicans who might have doubts otherwise a real chance to think again. >> the credibility, the aura, the halo that may be needed here. jackie, those eight senators
elections in a row, there is certainly time for some candid and honest discussion with our party. the first concept want to talk about is simply this -- america is not the federal government. [applause] take time to let that thought releasing in. america is not the federal government. in fact, america is not much about government at all. america's government is one of those things that you have to have but you sure don't want to much of it. it is like your family visiting over the holidays. i've got to be careful, my wife is here. this is the polar opposite of the political debate in our country today we've got one party that wants to be in charge of the federal government's of they can expand and another party that wants to be in charge of the federal government so they can get it under control. i am here to tell you that as a terrible debate. it is a debate fought entirely on our opponents terms, a debate about which party can better manage the federal government is a small and shortsighted debate. if our vision is not bigger than that, we simply don't deserve to win. our public discourse
pay for equal work and marriage equality and election reform and immigration reform and a policy response to help us reduce gun violence. >> our journey is not complete until all our children, from the streets of detroit to the hills of appalachia to the quiet lanes of newtown know that they are cared for and cherished and always safe from harm. that is our generation's task. to make these words, these rights, these values, of life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness real for every american. >> tying the policies which he is associated with and which are associated with his party and which are associated with a liberal idea of american governance to the basic fundamental ideas of what america is. that was the whole point, right? as with the other issues that president obama name-checked so specifically in his inaugural address this week, the things that got his speech branded as so liberal this week, what president ao. bama was alluding to there at the end by bringing up gun violence in his inaugural address is a set of policies that he and vice president biden have proposed
elections of lower saxony is busy choosing their parliament and the result is looking extremely close. it is being seen as a dress rehearsal for several elections in september and a verdict on chancellor angela merkel herself. david mcalester represents her party and is close to her. the poll suggests is neck-and- neck with the opposition social democrats and the green party. with go live now to hand over. what is the latest you are hearing there? >> the latest we are hearing is that it's going to be a long night. we will have to wait for the regional polling stations to be counted. the parties are really neck-and- neck and it could be angela merkel's christian democratic union or it could be the greens and social democrats. this is a bellwether region. this has farmers, big industry, europe's biggest automaker, volkswagen is located here. the religious split is catholic and protestant. what happens here is will what happened across the country generally speaking. that is why angela merkel made seven campaign stops here along with david mcallister, the christian democratic premier in
- connected crowd. what was more important, the first time barack obama was elected. first african american president or the fact that he was just real. let's go inside. i want to tell you some of what they had to say. >> reporter: the historic theater was jumping on stage with the kind of jazz they want to improve. >> i want them to leave the president alone. >> reporter: but outside the upscale gathering waited. >> they have a little more power. >> they have supported president barack obama a second time. and their money, their campaign, and their votes. >> mitch mcconnell said he would be a one-term president. four years ago a line of symbolism and it was. a lot of people are telling us tonight they are looking for programs from the president from this point on. >> on gun controls, barack knows what to do. >> i'd like to see him focus more on education. everything starts with education. >> reporter: they are headlining this private inaugural party. planning to be here well into the morning. the mlk holiday, most have it off. >> the whole world out there loves our president. it's not just
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
, there was an election last year. it did not go our way. like you, i understand full well that elections have consequences. the vice president off house is a few houses away from here. i was looking forward to taking on the big challenges. there are two ways to define defeat -- you can deny it or you can choose to learn from it. i choose to learn from it. the way that i see it, our defeat is all the more reason to lay out our vision and lay out specifics with a broader appeal. it will be difficult without a arner in the white house. -- without a partner in the white house. i believe that we can do this. we have to deal with the fact that president obama has a second term. that is the topic of my talk today. a second term will present a lot of new challenges for our side. it will also present a lot of opportunities. we will need something that we occasionally overlook. i would like to explain what that is and why we need it. first, a context. worst term,dent's we argued against big government in theory -- in his first term, we argued against big government in theory. obamacare is no longer a 2
is not the election or swearing in of a president. what we're doing is celebrating each other and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. after we celebrate let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy not only of our past but also of our future. god bless you guys. i love you. we'll see you tomorrow. [ applause ] >> the president of the united states with the first lady and the vice president and the second lady over at the national building museum here in washington. the festivities only just beginning. getting ready for the big inauguration tomorrow. piers morgan is getting ready to take over the coverage. >> very exciting. i've never done on a inauguration before. i'm struck by the body language of the president. he seems a very relaxed man. he looks a man much more at ease with himself than the nerves and stuff that came last time. >> four years as president and now another four years. he was reelected pretty impressively. i think that brings a sense of self-confidence and you can see that coming through. >> it won't be the same huge crowds
it that necessarily in your face but he was standing by some things he felt he got elected on but how will it be perceived? some republicans have already said they are not happy. >> he was direct, blunt, and aggressive. this was an address where the president said i won the election, and i am be aggressive in the second term to push my agenda. republicans will not be happy. democrats will be fired up about the idea high could be a bit more aggressive the second term than in the first term. folks on the left are happy he got health care reform done. that he got the stimulus. a lot of democrats believe he did not go hard enough against the republicans in the first time. to become the first president to use the word "gay" in an address or to defend entitlement programs at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits, he threw down the gauntlet and made clear, i won the election, i will stand for these following things. he did not go in great detail. he does that next month. he made clear he is coming out where he is and he will come out swinging and he thinks he
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
that the 2012 election is a definitive test of your proposition. the reason is obama did not have a opponent who presented a clear and strong argument for reagan knight perspective of stronger government, less taxes, less dependency. you know, romney was a good man but he basically ran on the economy, lousy economy, we need a new ceo in washington. it didn't work. i think we will get a good tis of this in 2016. we are going to have the four years of obama's hyper liberalism, the kind of stuff he elucidated and enuns dated yesterday in the inaugural address. and i would say that if our ideology, conservative, small government ideology is correct, it will leave a mess behind. but we will also need as conservatives, republicans if you like, a standard bearer in 2016 who can make the case. and there is not a dearth of them. we have a very strong bench. we have got ryan. we have got rubio. we have got the governors, there is a whole young generation of conservatives who can make the case that will be the test. although i will say that if liberals keep winning elections, then your theory of a fundamen
about him than it does about her. and i can only say they have not changed since the election. they're making -- playing politics with this. when we have a secretary of state who took full responsib responsibility, who ordered an independent review and will not rest until we get to the bottom of this. so i think at the end of the day, secretary clinton showed just what a strong and courageous leader she is. she is not going to back down -- >> but they're not playing politics -- >> yes, they're playing politics. >> they're playing politics with not only secretary clinton, they're playing politics with people's lives. we're talking 4,000 in iraq that he has ignored. that was not a major catastro e catastrophe? i mean, it's like no limit to what they will do to score a cheap political point. >> that's exactly right. and i have to tell you that the american people resent this. they resented it in the election when they tried to turn against our president in ways that were so unfair it would take us hours and hours to discuss it. people rejected it. and they saw sitting there a woman wh
. and it was a pure ideological election. because there were no personalities involved. you weren't voting for president. you want boating up and down on a figure. you were voting on issues and the dominant issue was obama and as a scare, the stimulus committee increase in spending, the expansion of the government. or to put it in a more abstract and grand was the difference between federal and state which was tilting more toward state. when the question is put that way, the country shows itself to be center-right country. had republicans been able to duplicate those conditions, that framework in 2012, they would have won. but it is not the same election. 2010 is almost purely ideological election. perhaps the most ideological since 1980. then you get to 2010, when you have a personality involved and you have a figure represents one side. romney is a good man. i like him. i think he is an honorable man, and i think he would have made an excellent president. but he was a bad candidate particularly in an election that could have been one had been an election about ideas and philosophy. i thi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 256 (some duplicates have been removed)